29 Years in 100 Words

Here’s the biggest lesson I’ve learned in 29 years, summed up in 100 words:

patience* patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience patience.

*With yourself. With others. With your work.

Looking for a more “profound” realization? Don’t.

There is no need to go deeper until you master the basics.

 

Daniel DiPiazza
@Rich20Something

Daniel is the founder and CEO of Rich20Something.

A millennial business mastermind, he has successfully started three consecutive freelance businesses and scaled them to over $100K in revenue with zero startup capital. His work is regularly featured in Time Magazine, Fortune, Entrepreneur, Business Insider, Fox News, and Yahoo! Business.

His debut book, Rich20Something, publishes on May 2, 2017.

  • David Jones

    I was recently asked by a much younger man what was the key to my 20+ relationship – my response was exactly what you have discovered and shared in this post. it is true on so many fronts. Keep up the great work, Daniel.

  • Good post. I agree. In the blog I just launched, I just spoke, albeit indirectly, to a similar point. The right timing is never found by someone who seeks perfection, and someone seeking perfection can never achieve it soon enough. It’ll lead to a lack of progress. Someone who accepts the concept of patience as a virtue will make progress because they can accept simply getting closer to the best way of doing something, then capitalize on it. A perfectionist trashes imperfect efforts, aims to remove failed attempts from memory, and fails to learn from their struggles. Patience accepts experience as the master teacher.

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